Analogue Satellite Receivers

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DIGIQuest 8600CI
DIGIQuest 8600CI

Satellite (Analogue)

"For: Strong AV performance; Some worthwhile features; User-friendly. Against: No EPG; Manual searching is limited; Blind search isn't blind."

1 review

 

Bush BFSAT01HD
Bush BFSAT01HD

Satellite (Analogue), Satellite (Freesat & Sky), Satellite (Digital); Integrated Modules / …

A very respectable Freesat box in its own right, the X matches the FOXSAT-HD in picture and sound. Where it falters is the awkward and unintuitive menu system.

1 review

 

More information at: What Hi-Fi? Sound and Vision, issue 8/2008 Group Test: The HD Freesat revolution: the battle of the boxes Freesat, the HD free-to-air rival to Freeview and Sky's limited selection of free channels has recently launched, and What Hi-Fi? compares three new challengers to Humax's FOXSAT-HD. In test: Four HD Freesat boxes were reviewed and rated based on picture, sound and functionality. All products achieved a score of 4 out of 5 stars. … to review

Grundig GUFSAT01HD
Grundig GUFSAT01HD

Satellite (Digital), Satellite (Analogue), Satellite (Freesat & Sky); Integrated Modules / …

What Hi-Fi? explains that this Grundig model, the Goodmans GFSAT200HD and the Bush BFSAT01HD are identical in practical terms, save for slight superficial differences. And there's almost no …

1 review | 18 opinions (Average)

 

 

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Information about the category

Analogue satelite receivers can be bought for a reasonable price as either a combination device with their digital counterparts, or as a single device. The biggest drawback is the poor image quality they provide, as well as the time-consuming installation. It is necessary to have a separate LNB and receiver for each TV when running multiple television sets.


Some, particularly higher priced, satellite receivers can process and send both DVB (Digital Video Broadcasting) and analogue signals to a television, video or audio device. There are also devices that are designed to receive only analogue signals, and these are usually cheaper, with complete systems often available for as little as £75. There are also some televisions which come with an integrated satellite receiver for processing the signals internally, therefore not requiring a separate intermediary device. Satellite receivers have the advantage of receiving far more channels than are usually possible with cable or aerial, and can include channels in many other languages, and depending on the satellite the reception can be free. Buying an analogue satellite receiver is necessary for anyone looking for this kind of programming diversity, but compared to digital receivers, the image quality is not as good, and the installation of the dish can be complicated. Poor weather can also affect the signal making the image quality even poorer. If there are going to be several televisions connected to the satellite, each one will require its own LNB converter (Low Noise Back) and receiver. It is worth keeping in mind that all analogue signals will eventually be discontinued and therefore analogue receivers will only have a relatively short life span.